DESTINATIONS CULTURE AGENDA CONNOISSEUR'S GUIDE ALTERNATE ROUTES INSIDER'S VIEW NEWS PHOTO GALLERIES

CHOOSE DESTINATION

Tel Aviv

Museums and galleriesWhere to eatWhere to shopInsider's viewConnoisseur's Guide

CHOOSE OBJECT

Insider: Anna Mihailova Adamsky« BACK « TO BEGINNING

RECEIVE OUR NEWSLETTER

Add your e-mail address to receive our monthly news.

WE RECOMMEND:

Jewellery by Artists: From Picasso to Koons, an exhibition organised by the culture and art portal Arterritory.com

Destinations · Asia · israel · Tel Aviv · Insider's view ·

Insider: Anna Mihailova Adamsky

Author: Anothertravelguide.com0 COMMENTS

Insider: Anna Mihailova Adamsky

Tel Aviv is an non-stop city

Anna Mihailova Adamsky was born and bred in Riga, educated in Europe and the U.S. and now calls Tel Aviv her second home. After a diverse and extensive career of practicing law in the EU, the U.S. and Israel, she became more drawn to issues that have always fascinated her, like contemporary art and the future of museums. Anna is currently the Director of International Relations and Development at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel’s foremost modern and contemporary art museum.

What do you love most about living in Tel Aviv?

Tel Aviv is a very welcoming place, no matter who you are and where you come from. It is also very laid back, for better or worse, but I like it. The weather is great most of the time, people are good-looking and everyone has a dog. Add to the mix amazing food, beautiful beaches, creative energy and chatty taxi drivers – what’s not to like?

What should one definitely do to catch the vibe of Tel Aviv in all of its diversity?

It's so hard to identify a single thing, so here are a couple: stroll through Levinsky Market on a Friday morning and savour its range of flavours, scents and stories; stop for coffee at one of the historic kiosks in the centre of Rothschild Boulevard; check out small boutiques in Neve Tzedek, one of Tel Aviv’s oldest districts; and go to the beach!

Which is your favourite neighbourhood in Tel Aviv and why?

I gravitate towards the southern part of the city and like spending time in areas like Florentin, Noga and Jaffa Flea Market. Although no place can avoid gentrification, these areas have still kept their character, authenticity and unique vibe, where bohemian and creative types mix with the working class and where people of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds contribute their stories to the rich urban canvas. It’s best to enjoy these areas when you are not in a rush.

What are your favourite architectural landmarks in Tel Aviv?

Tel Aviv is well known for its “White City” architecture and has the largest number of buildings in the International style of any city in the world. You will notice either spectacularly renovated or gracefully dilapidated exemplars throughout the city. My favourite architectural landmark, though, is Asia House, a unique curvilinear structure from the late 1970s that stands out from the Brutalist style popular back then.

Which are the must-visit places for lovers of contemporary art?

The Tel Aviv Museum of Art is, of course, the best place to visit to discover the best modern and contemporary art, both Israeli and international. The museum has amazing collections, including an unparalleled collection of European modern art as well as a unique and well-curated collection of Israeli art. Tel Aviv also boasts a vibrant gallery scene showcasing emerging and established artists who make Israel an exciting hub for contemporary art. For more adventurous types, I would recommend checking out a couple of galleries and artist studios in the industrial Kiryat Hamelacha neighbourhood, located in the southern part of the city. While in the area, be on the lookout for the great street art that Tel Aviv is famous for.

Can you name your five favourite restaurants/cafés in Tel Aviv? And why are they your favourites?

The first one, hands down, would be Cafelix – an unassuming coffee house and roastery that serves the best coffee in Tel Aviv. Their baristas are as excellent as the coffee they make. An energy boost and great mood for the day are guaranteed.

I also absolutely have to mention Abu Hassan/Ali Karavan, because they have the most amazing hummus. It goes without saying that one cannot visit Israel without trying this dish; hummus is not just food, it's a matter of culture. Abu Hassan is the kind of place where you are not given a menu and there is always a line. The place started in 1959 near the Jaffa port and now has three branches, all of them in Jaffa.

Another one of my favourites is Casino San Remo, a local bar and café in the Noga district of Tel Aviv. It's great for breakfasts, long talks, burgers, people watching, late-night drinks and pretty much everything, depending on what you're in the mood for. I once had friends visiting from Canada and we ended up there for breakfast, lunch and dinner on a single day.

For a more upscale dining experience I would recommend Pastel Brasserie and Bar at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. Pastel offers an inventive twist on classic French cuisine with seasonal produce and local flavours. It is a perfect spot for those who love art and appreciate good food and good design. During the day come here for a power lunch, and in the evening for a romantic dinner.

Jaffa–Tel Aviv is the restaurant of Israel's celebrity chef Haim Cohen, and it will require you to venture beyond the confines of your typical tourist route. It is an embodiment (at the higher end) of what Israeli cuisine really is, blending seamlessly the best of Eastern and Western culinary traditions.

Where do you recommend your friends stay in Tel Aviv?

My close friends know where there is a spare couch they can count on. I actually recommend spending less on accommodation when visiting Tel Aviv, because you will likely not use your hotel room very much – there are so many things to do outside, day and night! In addition, the quality/cost ratio is still not very high when it comes to local hotels. There are a good number of recently opened boutique hotels that may appeal to design aficionados. If you go for this option and your budget allows it, consider The Norman, the epitome of urban chic and understated elegance.

What is the biggest stereotype about Tel Aviv and is it true?

They say Tel Aviv is an non-stop city, and this is indeed true.

SHARE:
Facebook Twitter

 

Your comments

Unfortunately there are no comments yet.

Your name:

Time of visit:

Your comment: