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Top European Restaurants by Martins Ritins

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Connoisseur's Guide · Europe · sweden · Stockholm · Top European Restaurants by Martins Ritins

Frantzén/Lindeberg

Author: Mārtiņš Rītiņš0 COMMENTS

Frantzén/Lindeberg

Frantzén/Lindeberg is a small restaurant in the heart of the Old Town of Stockholm. Run by the Chefs Björn Frantzén and Daniel Lindeberg, it has held some of the top spots in quite a few lists compiled by international food and wine critics. The compact nineteen-seat restaurant does not lend itself well to extensive interior design analysis: the Frantzén/Lindeberg rooms are pure and white like fresh untrodden snow and its lighting fixtures are limited to a few naked light bulbs suspended from the ceiling here and there by long dangling cords.
Before we even enter the restaurant, we are greeted at the front door with courteous attentiveness and cordiality by a man in an elegant albeit somewhat amusing British-style bowler-hat, instantly making me think that this just may be the nicest place I have recently visited.
At the table on which, wrapped in a cloth, the dough soon to be transformed into our bread is safely cradled in a special box, we are introduced to the wines selected to accompany our dinner. As a prologue to the menu, we are served a glass of water and a glass of champagne each; the latter is - untypically for a restaurant - refilled three times. The dough, on the other hand, makes a trip to the oven only to return later as bread - piping hot, delicious and fragrant as a moment of romance in a fresh grainstack.
While sipping our champagne, we are shown a live and moving langouste; it will shortly reappear roughly chopped and exquisitely delicious, served with white truffle, cauliflower and brown butter and vinegar dressing.
Before that, however, we taste a carrot macaroon with poultry liver filling. It crackles as you bite into it and then gently, gently melts in your mouth...
The next paragraph in this prologue to the menu is marked by fresh flounder with duck egg and Norwegian lobster complemented by a composition of autumn herbs, horseradish and fried butter. Each element of this marvel comes alive in the unique flavour of its own.
The most intense passage of the prologue is comprised of Satio Tempestas, a thirty-six ingredient composition of produce from the Frantzén/Lindeberg vegetable garden, scattered with specially prepared fish scales for a distinctive accent. The seemingly simple flavour combinations of Satio Tempestas reveal fabulous transitions and correlations; meanwhile the scallop, served in a beautiful shell among straw and small stones represents a most beautiful explication of the menu, followed by a message about the perfection of a morsel of cod.
The prologue comes to conclusion with Swedish dairy beef served in three ways: blood pancake with foie gras, almond sprouts and lingonberry marmalade; seared tartare with caviar and a bite of eel, as well as fillet with celeries, bone marrow and chestnut honey. I have to admit I would never have believed that dairy beef could possibly retain such a perfect flavour.
The sweet epilogue of the Frantzén/Lindeberg menu opens with pine nut ice cream scattered with moss, bilberries and maple butter; then comes chocolate sorbet followed by sea buckthorn and carrot foam with the surprisingly added touch of horseradish.
The whole natural way of serving the food at Frantzén/Lindeberg is particularly appealing and appetising, using everything from marble slabs, earthenware pots and wooden boxes, as well as shells and natural fibre fabric napkins.

Lilla Nygatan 21
111 28 Stockholm, Sweden

T.: +46 (0)8 20 85 80
E-mail: info@frantzen-lindeberg.com
www.frantzen-lindeberg.com/en

 

01/2012

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